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Creative English to Hindi Translator needed - 10 INR per 100 words

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Creative English to Hindi Translator needed - 10 INR per 100 words

Only skills required - You should be a passionate writer. Don't send samples...just follow instructions below.

Please translate the text below to simple Hindi for general audience to understand. All applications without the sample will be rejected. 

Leave out the names of people and places in English. 

EDIT - I SEE MANY PROPOSALS THAT ARE USING AUTOMATED TOOLS SUCH AS G TRANSLATE. WHY WOULD I PAY SOMEONE TO TRANSLATE WHEN I CAN ALSO USE THOSE TOOLS. TRY TO USE YOUR BRAIN INSTEAD! 

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Mortimer reads to Holmes and Watson an early 18th-century manuscript that tells of how, in the time of the “Great Rebellion” [i.e., 1641-51], Hugo Baskerville, progenitor of the ancient and wealthy Baskerville line and a “wild, profane and godless man,” kidnapped the maiden daughter of a yeoman who held lands near his estate. For this crime, the document claims, Hugo Baskerville died, ravaged by “a great, black beast, shaped like a hound, yet larger than any hound that ever mortal eye has rested upon.” The Baskervilles thus believe a curse has been placed upon their family. Holmes dismisses the story, but is more intrigued when Mortimer reads a recent newspaper account of the death of Sir Charles Baskerville. A generous philanthropist and a potential candidate for Parliament in an upcoming election, Sir Charles (descendant, of course, of the notorious Hugo) had restored much of his famly’s greatness after it had fallen upon hard times by capitalizing on financial speculations in South Africa. A widower, Sir Charles lived only with his servants at Baskerville Hall, a married couple, the Barrymores, who worked as butler and housekeeper. He lived near Mortimer, who was his personal physician; as well as one Mr. Frankland of Lafter Hall and Mr. Stapleton, a naturalist. Sir Charles was keenly interested in the legend of the Baskerville curse, asking Mortimer several times whether he ever saw or heard strange creatures and noises, especially “the baying of a hound.” Each night before retiring to bed, Sir Charles would walk the Hall’s “famous yew alley.” He never returned from that walk on the evening of May 4; at midnight, Mr. Barrymore found his master lying dead at the alley’s end, past its gate that opens onto the moor surrounding the Hall. Sir Charles’ face wore a terrifyingly distorted expression (attributed in the autopsy to cardiac exhaustion). Barrymore noted that the appearance of Sir Charles’ footprints altered once he had passed that gate, but reported no other physical clues to the inquest. Information that the newspaper account does not include, but what Mortimer now tells Holmes, is that, three weeks prior to Sir Charles’ death, Mortimer had visited the nobleman and caught a glimpse of some large, unknown black animal—the sight of which visibly shook Sir Charles. Furthermore, in the yew-alley, Mortimer saw the “fresh and clear” footprints of a gigantic hound.

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